TRAPPED
1949, 78 min, Dir: Richard Fleischer

Producer Bryan Foy replicates the success of T-MEN (1947) with a gritty tale of Secret Service agents hunting a counterfeiting racket through the streets of Los Angeles. Expertly helmed by director Richard Fleischer, the film pairs a young Lloyd Bridges with 22-year old Barbara Payton, whose tempestuous career and tragic life became a staple of ’50s tabloids. Also starring the suave John Hoyt, and featuring a climactic showdown inside the downtown L.A. Red Car barn. Not on DVD!


TRY AND GET ME
1951, Film Noir Foundation, 91 min, USA, Dir: Cy Endfield

The true story of a shocking 1934 kidnapping and murder in San Jose provided the inspiration for one of the most compelling—and unjustly neglected—masterpieces of film noir. Ex-GI Howard Tyler (Frank Lovejoy), struggling to support his family, meets flashy hoodlum Jerry Slocum (Lloyd Bridges), who eases the gullible Howard into a lucrative life of crime. Their escapade turns dark and desperate when Jerry takes hostage the son of a wealthy local businessman. One of the last films made in the U.S. by blacklisted writer/director Cy Endfield before he relocated to England, TRY AND GET ME (originally released as THE SOUND OF FURY) has been restored by the Film Noir Foundation so that it may be experienced in its original form by future generations and assume its rightful status as one of the great films of its era. NOT ON DVD!


HIGH NOON
1952, Paramount, 85 min, USA, Dir: Fred Zinnemann

No movie hero ever walked taller than Gary Cooper in HIGH NOON. As Marshal Will Kane, he’s ready to turn in his badge and settle down with his new wife (Grace Kelly) until he learns a criminal is arriving on the noon train bent on revenge. When the locals turn a deaf ear to Kane’s pleas for help (even deputy Lloyd Bridges refuses), the lawman must face a gang of killers alone. This iconic Western, named by the AFI as one of the 100 greatest films of all time, won four Oscars, including a Best Actor award for Cooper and Best Song for “Do Not Forsake Me, Oh My Darlin’.” With Katy Jurado. Favorite film of former president Bill Clinton, who screened it a record 17 times at the White House.


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