NEW YORK, NEW YORK
1977, Park Circus/MGM, 163 min, USA, Dir: Martin Scorsese

Director Martin Scorsese called it a “film noir musical.” A powerful and misunderstood tribute to musical forefathers Vincente Minnelli and Stanley Donen, it melds larger-than-life soundstage musicals and kitchen-sink realism. Scorsese mainstay Robert De Niro stars as Jimmy Doyle, a WWII veteran who returns home on V-Day and attempts to pick up Francine Evans (Liza Minnelli) at a huge party. Her career as a singer is on the rise while his inventive saxophone style has not yet caught on. Often improvised, De Niro's performance comes off like a more musical cousin of Travis Bickle, while Minnelli soars in the final act. The breathtaking production design is by the legendary Boris Leven, art director of numerous noir films such as CRISS CROSS and SUDDEN FEAR as well as classic musicals WEST SIDE STORY and THE SOUND OF MUSIC. Cinematography by Laszlo Kovacs (EASY RIDER, FIVE EASY PIECES). Also features Mary Kay Place, Barry Primus and Dick Miller.


CUL-DE-SAC
1966, MGM Repertory, 111 min, Dir: Roman Polanski

One of director Roman Polanski’s most fascinating and criminally underrated films of the 1960s, CUL-DE-SAC is by turns a surreal black comedy, existential arthouse drama and twisted thriller set in an isolated mansion cut off from the mainland, where a hen-pecked husband (Donald Pleasence) and his domineering French wife (the lovely Francoise Dorleac) are surprised by two fleeing criminals (Lionel Stander and Jack MacGowran).


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