DOG DAY AFTERNOON
1975, Warner Bros., 130 min, USA, Dir: Sidney Lumet

Put-upon everyman Al Pacino, squeezed in the vise of pressures from his dysfunctional family and his transsexual lover (Chris Sarandon), finally cracks, robbing an NYC bank with shell-shocked vet John Cazale (THE DEER HUNTER) to finance Sarandon’s sex-change operation. Based on a true story, DOG DAY AFTERNOON is one of director Sidney Lumet’s most acutely observed and compassionate slices of life in the Big Apple. An Oscar winner for Frank Pierson’s original screenplay.


THE CONVERSATION
1974, American Zoetrope, 113 min, USA, Dir: Francis Ford Coppola

Sandwiched between THE GODFATHER and GODFATHER II, THE CONVERSATION is Coppola at his very best - a sinister, unstoppable portrait of moral (and physical) violence and the sheer paranoia of living in the modern world. Gene Hackman is tremendous as fly-on-the-wall surveillance expert Harry Caul, drawn into a murderous whirlpool when he’s hired to bug lovers Frederic Forrest and Cindy Williams. Co-starring John Cazale, Allen Garfield, Teri Garr and Harrison Ford.


THE DEER HUNTER
1978, Universal, 183 min, USA, Dir: Michael Cimino

From the opening scenes of hunter Robert De Niro and friends Christopher Walken, John Savage and John Cazale stalking deer in the mist-shrouded Pennsylvania hills, to the shattering prisoner-of-war games in the jungles of Vietnam, director Michael Cimino's masterwork is a sprawling, ambitious epic of men wounded by pride, country and friendship, struggling to drag each other back to a place of safety. Co-starring Meryl Streep. Winner of five Oscars, including Best Picture, Best Director and Best Supporting Actor (Walken).


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