SLAP SHOT
1977, Universal, 122 min, USA, Dir: George Roy Hill

Director George Roy Hill (BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID) and writer Nancy Dowd (Best Screenplay winner for COMING HOME) bring to the screen this incredibly funny and foul-mouthed saga of a has-been hockey team from a dying-on-the-vine Pennsylvania town. Paul Newman is both the team’s coach and a player who strives for a winning strategy. When an atypical fit of violence erupts in the rink, it creates a surprising spike in the team’s popularity, and Newman suddenly has a guaranteed approach to bring in the fans. Co-starring Michael Ontkean as a fish-out-of-water Ivy League player disgruntled by the bad sportsmanship, Strother Martin as the team’s manager, Jerry Houser as Dave “Killer” Carlson and Jennifer Warren as Newman’s long-suffering beautician wife. Reportedly Newman’s favorite of his films. "Easily the greatest hockey film ever made. …Paul Newman stars as the coach/player for a second-rate team who can't win and can't even get arrested until they hire three brothers with Coke-bottle glasses named the Hansons. These three violent goons begin beating other players to a pulp in every game, not only drawing attention to the team but beginning a winning streak. …Irreverent and very funny." - Jeffrey M. Anderson, combustiblecelluloid.com


SUMMER OF '42
1971, Warner Bros., 103 min, USA, Dir: Robert Mulligan

This sleeper hit was based on writer Herman Raucher’s experiences as a teen on Nantucket Island during WWII. While hanging out with his friends on the beach, Hermie (Gary Grimes) is drawn to a beautiful older woman (Jennifer O’Neill) whose soldier husband is on duty in France. Though as obsessed with sex as pals Oscy and Benjie, Hermie comes to realize how complicated relationships can be when emotions factor in. Robert Surtees’ cinematography lends this coming-of-age story a nostalgic glow, as does Michel Legrand’s Oscar-winning score and its haunting theme song, “The Summer Knows.”


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