RED HEADED WOMAN
1932, Warner Bros., 79 min, USA, Dir: Jack Conway

The legendary Jean Harlow delivers a star-making performance in this provocative pre-Hays Code comedy as a charming gold digger who sleeps her way to fortune. Secretary Lillian Andrews sets her sights on her boss, eventually luring him away from his happy marriage to his childhood sweetheart. But instead of making a big splash in society, she is rejected. After casting her attention on a coal king, Lillian realizes that she loves her French chauffeur (Charles Boyer). The film is often cited as one of the motion pictures that brought about more stringent censorship.


THREE WISE GIRLS
1932, Sony Repertory, 68 min, USA, Dir: William Beaudine

Jean Harlow, Mae Clarke and Marie Prevost are the wise girls of the title in this pre-Code look at life and love in New York City. When small-town soda jerk Cassie (Harlow) arrives in Manhattan, she catches the eye of a wealthy - but married - man (Walter Byron), and her two friends are of differing opinions on whether Cassie should pursue the affair. Robert Riskin provided the dialogue here, and Andy Devine makes a brief but memorable appearance as a chauffeur.


LIBELED LADY
1936, Warner Bros., 98 min, USA, Dir: Jack Conway

Remade a decade later as EASY TO WED, this screwball comedy gem features a veritable dream team of MGM stars at the top of their game. Heiress Myrna Loy sues the New York Evening Star when it paints her as a home-wrecker, but editor Spencer Tracy thinks he can get the suit dropped by trapping the wealthy woman between one of his ex-reporters (William Powell) and his own fiancée (Jean Harlow). Powell’s hilarious fishing sequence is but one of the many highlights.


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