WHITE MATERIAL
2009, IFC Films, 106 min, France/Cameroon, Dir: Claire Denis

Returning to the African continent on which she was raised, Claire Denis directs yet another ruminative examination of race relations in a colonial environment, this time set against the backdrop of an unspecified civil war. French farmer Maria Vial (Isabelle Huppert) is given a stern warning to abandon her coffee plantation and its impending harvest and seek refuge for her family before violence begins. But stubbornness and white privilege keep Maria trudging forward, as she attempts to keep her family together while seeking the help of local workers to finish the harvest. Featuring Christopher Lambert and Isaach De Bankolé. “A striking film filled with images that sometimes reveal their full meaning only when their beauty curdles in the chain of signification.” - Manohla Dargis, New York Times.


LOUDER THAN BOMBS
2015, The Orchard, 109 min, Norway/France/Denmark/USA, Dir: Joachim Trier

In director Joachim Trier’s first feature in English, war photographer Isabelle Reed (Isabelle Huppert) - whose work has taken her to the most dangerous places in the world – dies in a car accident just a few miles from her New York home. She leaves a grief-stricken husband, Gene (Gabriel Byrne), and sons Jonah (Jesse Eisenberg) and Conrad (Devin Druid). Three years later, working on a retrospective of Isabelle’s photography, Gene tries to enlist his sons’ help, but Jonah is overwhelmed by his marriage and a new baby, and hard-hit teenager Conrad has withdrawn into the world of computer games. “A family drama of extraordinary beauty.” - Joe Morgenstern, The Wall Street Journal.


ELLE
2016, Sony Pictures Classics, 130 min, France/ Germany/ Belgium, Dir: Paul Verhoeven

Director Paul Verhoeven and star Isabelle Huppert both reach career peaks with this complex psychological thriller. Huppert stars as a successful video game executive who is raped in her home; rather than go to the police, she identifies her masked attacker and engages him in a twisted cat-and-mouse game. “A masterpiece of suave perversity, the movie leads its audience through a meticulously constructed maze of ambiguity, scrambling our assumptions and expectations at every turn.” - A. O. Scott, The New York Times.


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