THE SEA WOLF
1941, Warner Bros.,, 100 min, USA, Dir: Michael Curtiz

The definitive cinematic version of Jack London’s famed novel returns to the big screen. Edward G. Robinson’s magnificent portrayal of Wolf Larsen is the centerpiece of a darkly fatalistic tale adapted by Robert Rossen (ALL THE KING’S MEN, THE HUSTLER) who blends a distinctive anti-Nazi sentiment (initiated into American movies by the brothers Warner) with an unforgettable saga of tyranny at sea. An all-star cast of John Garfield, Ida Lupino, Gene Lockhart and Barry Fitzgerald add dramatic heft to Curtiz’s brilliantly helmed epic.


DEEP VALLEY
1947, Warner Bros., 104 min, Dir: Jean Negulesco

A shy girl (Ida Lupino) raised on a remote coastal farm by unloving parents (Henry Hull and Fay Bainter) has her world turned upside down when she falls in love with an escaped convict (Dane Clark) being hunted by a posse. One of Lupino’s most sensitive performances is bolstered by a nuanced screenplay by Salka Viertel and assured direction by Negulesco. Also starring Wayne Morris. Filmed on location at Palos Verdes and Big Bear Lake.


LADIES IN RETIREMENT
1941, Sony Repertory, 91 min, USA, Dir: Charles Vidor

Ida Lupino scores as a timid housekeeper who becomes enmeshed in murder and madness. Ida tends to an aged actress (Isobel Elsom) and persuades her to take in her two eccentric sisters (Elsa Lanchester and Edith Barrett). All bets are off when a mysterious stranger (Lupino's then-husband Louis Hayward) arrives to stir the pot further. There is nothing retiring about this suspenseful Victorian noir, which has been unjustly overlooked and underappreciated.


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