NIGHT AND THE CITY
1950, 20th Century Fox, 96 min, UK/USA, Dir: Jules Dassin

One of the most baroque and bleak film noirs of them all, its greatness - besides Richard Widmark's devastating portrayal of the maniacal, pathetic con man and small-time promoter Harry Fabian - is its stubborn refusal to allow even the tiniest ray of light into Harry's headlong descent into hell. Featuring an unforgettable supporting rogue's gallery, including Googie Withers, Herbert Lom, Francis L. Sullivan, Mike Mazurki, Stanislaus Zbyszko - and the gorgeous Gene Tierney (LAURA). With a screenplay by Jo Eisinger from the novel by Gerald Kersh.


HEAVEN CAN WAIT
1943, 20th Century Fox, 112 min, USA, Dir: Ernst Lubitsch

No, not the one with Warren Beatty, but the glorious Technicolor fantasy in which newly deceased Don Ameche arrives in Hell and reviews his life to learn if he’s going to remain Down There or not. With Gene Tierney, Charles Coburn, Marjorie Main, Eugene Pallette (did this guy ever take a vacation?), Spring Byington and a marvelous turn by Laird Cregar as a very genial…could it be Satan!?


LAURA
1944, 20th Century Fox, 88 min, Dir: Otto Preminger

Investigating a murder, chain-smoking Detective McPherson (Dana Andrews) falls in love with the dead woman - only to find out that it wasn't she who was murdered. Even in a genre known for its convoluted twists, LAURA is a one-of-a-kind film noir. The brilliant cast includes Gene Tierney as the gorgeous Laura, Clifton Webb as Waldo Lydecker and Vincent Price as Laura's fiancé, Shelby Carpenter. The famous haunting and nostalgic musical theme by David Raksin is unforgettable. The film is said to have been an inspiration for David Lynch’s “Twin Peaks.”


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