THE RAZOR’S EDGE
1946, 20th Century Fox, 145 min, USA, Dir: Edmund Goulding

A young man returns from World War I and searches for the meaning of life while surrounded by his unhappy and more materialistic friends. Based on the novel of the same name by W. Somerset Maugham, this was Tyrone Power's first film after his return from WWII. It was to serve as a signal to him that the head of the studio, Darryl F. Zanuck, was going to allow him to do more serious roles. The signal proved false. Also starring Gene Tierney, Clifton Webb, John Payne and Anne Baxter (who won a Best Supporting Actress Academy Award). THE RAZOR'S EDGE was the biggest grossing film for 20th Century Fox in 1946 and nominated for three other Oscars, including Best Picture.


WHERE THE SIDEWALK ENDS
1950, 20th Century Fox, 95 min, USA, Dir: Otto Preminger

Dana Andrews gives one of his most compelling performances as an angry and haunted New York cop whose violent streak leads to the killing of an informer. His attempts to cover up the crime only dig the hole deeper, as his lies make a suspect of an innocent man - the father of the woman he loves! Ben Hecht’s terrific script, based on the novel Night Cry by Victor Trivas, provides the bedrock for one of Preminger’s best film noirs, shot by the great Joseph LaShelle (LAURA).


LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN
1946, 20th Century Fox, 111 min, USA, Dir: John Stahl

Exhibit A in the argument that film noir isn't always black-and-white. Don't let the stunningly lush Technicolor fool you - this big-budget soap opera has the blackest of hearts and is as perverse and malignant as it got in the ’40s. Novelist Cornel Wilde falls for gorgeous Gene Tierney but has no idea of the darkness lurking behind those emerald eyes. A rare chance to see Leon Shamroy's Oscar-winning cinematography on the big screen.


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