THE STRANGER
1946, Park Circus/MGM, 95 min, USA, Dir: Orson Welles

Director Orson Welles’ suspenseful study of an escaped Nazi war criminal (played by Welles himself) living in a small Connecticut town, who is pursued by a federal agent (Edward G. Robinson) to a no-holds-barred climax. Loretta Young gives one of her finest screen performances as Welles’ unsuspecting wife. Ironically, this was Welles’ most successful film at the box office.


KEY LARGO
1948, Warner Bros., 101 min, USA, Dir: John Huston

Humphrey Bogart is Frank McCloud, a down-on-his-luck veteran visiting the father (Lionel Barrymore) and sister (Lauren Bacall) of his dead WWII buddy at their Florida Keys hotel just as a hurricane is about to hit. To make matters worse, on-the-run mobster Johnny Rocco (Edward G. Robinson) has decided to lay low there with his moll (Claire Trevor) and henchmen (among them, evil Thomas Gomez) while waiting to abscond to Cuba. One of Huston’s finest films, based on Maxwell Anderson’s stage play.


SCARLET STREET
1945, Kino Lorber, 103 min, USA, Dir: Fritz Lang

Fritz Lang's classic film noir reunited his WOMAN IN THE WINDOW stars Edward G. Robinson, Joan Bennett and Dan Duryea in a reworking of Jean Renoir's 1931 LA CHIENNE. Robinson's middle-aged bookkeeper and amateur artist becomes hopelessly ensnared by the seductive Bennett and her lover-pimp, Duryea. The result is a psychological thriller with Robinson's increasing desperation contrasting with his predators’ unremitting ruthlessness. As with WOMAN IN THE WINDOW, Lang reveals the potential criminal in the average citizen.


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