THE INNOCENTS
1961, 20th Century Fox, 100 min, UK, Dir: Jack Clayton

Director Jack Clayton also directed British New Wave gems ROOM AT THE TOP and THE PUMPKIN EATER, but his most famous film remains this goosepimple-inducing, shuddery adaptation of Henry James’ classic ghost story, “Turn Of The Screw.” Deborah Kerr is a repressed governess who is convinced that the ghosts of the previous governess and the woman’s equally dead, cruel lover, Quint (Peter Wyngarde), haunt the mansion and grounds of her innocent young charges (Martin Stephens, Pamela Franklin). Reality, superstition and warped psychology collide in this riveting, brilliantly photographed jewel of a film (lensed by future horror director Freddie Francis).


BLACK NARCISSUS
1947, MGM Repertory, 99 min, UK, Dir: Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s exquisite (and surprisingly erotic) drama of spiritual devotion and earthly temptation stars the luminous Deborah Kerr as a nun nearly overwhelmed by the physical beauty of her new Himalayan home, and the worldly charms of rugged David Farrar. Widely hailed as one of the most visually stunning films ever made (courtesy of Jack Cardiff’s Oscar-winning cinematography). Co-starring Sabu, Jean Simmons, Flora Robson. "Color, sex, exotic locations - it was a big hit in austerity-stricken England!" - Michael Powell


FROM HERE TO ETERNITY
1953, Sony Repertory, 118 min, Dir: Fred Zinnemann

This 1953 Oscar winner (for Best Picture, Director, Cinematography and others) remains a timeless combination of war movie and love story that's as smart and adult as it is entertaining. James Jones' novel about military life at a Hawaiian army barracks on the brink of America’s entering World War II is the source for a riveting drama starring Burt Lancaster, Deborah Kerr, Donna Reed, Frank Sinatra, Montgomery Clift and many others.


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