SLUMS OF BEVERLY HILLS
1998, Fox Searchlight, 91 min, Dir: Tamara Jenkins

Growing up on the outskirts of Beverly Hills, Vivian (Natasha Lyonne) dreams of a life in which her car salesman father (Alan Arkin) can finally afford a home and retire and she and her brothers can fit in at their prestigious high school. Those dreams seemingly become reality when Vivian’s wealthy uncle Mickie (Carl Reiner) promises them a luxury apartment. The only catch is that Vivian must keep an eye on his daughter (Marisa Tomei), who’s struggling to kick an addiction and finish nursing school - a task that is sure to push the young 14-year-old to her limit. Funny, observant and filled with memorable performances, this remarkable feature debut from writer-director Tamara Jenkins is richly deserving of its cult status.


THE LAST UNICORN
1982, Conlan Press, 92 min, USA, Dir: Arthur Rankin Jr., Jules Bass

While directors Arthur Rankin Jr. and Jules Bass are best known for their stop-motion TV specials, they also did traditional cel work, and the Japanese animation house they used here would go on to become Studio Ghibli. Adapted by Peter S. Beagle from his novel, this touching fantasy features the voices of Alan Arkin, Jeff Bridges, Angela Lansbury, Christopher Lee and Mia Farrow as the titular creature on a magic-filled quest to find others of her kind. With music by Jimmy Webb and soft-rock hitmakers America.


CATCH-22
1970, Paramount, 122 min, USA, Dir: Mike Nichols

After their triumphant collaboration on THE GRADUATE, director Mike Nichols and screenwriter Buck Henry reunited for this adaptation of Joseph Heller’s satirical WWII novel. The all-star cast includes Alan Arkin, Richard Benjamin, Art Garfunkel, Bob Newhart, Anthony Perkins, Paula Prentiss, Jon Voight, Orson Welles and Henry himself.


Syndicate content