DOG DAY AFTERNOON
1975, Warner Bros., 130 min, USA, Dir: Sidney Lumet

Put-upon everyman Al Pacino, squeezed in the vise of pressures from his dysfunctional family and his transsexual lover (Chris Sarandon), finally cracks, robbing an NYC bank with shell-shocked vet John Cazale (THE DEER HUNTER) to finance Sarandon’s sex-change operation. Based on a true story, DOG DAY AFTERNOON is one of director Sidney Lumet’s most acutely observed and compassionate slices of life in the Big Apple. An Oscar winner for Frank Pierson’s original screenplay.


INSOMNIA
2002, Warner Bros., 118 min, USA, Dir: Christopher Nolan

Detective Al Pacino heads for Alaska to track serial killer Robin Williams, but the differences between the two men might not be as stark as Pacino would like to admit. Remaking the 1997 Norwegian crime masterpiece, Christopher Nolan infuses the material with his own sensibility to create another of his portraits of deeply driven, deeply flawed and all-too-human heroes.


WILDE SALOMÉ
2011, Salome Productions, 90 min, USA, Dir: Al Pacino

This filmic collage captures the highs and lows of presenting a challenging work by one of the greatest writers of the 20th century, Oscar Wilde. Staging the play live in Los Angeles, director Al Pacino tackles its problems and issues and helps discover a new star, Jessica Chastain, in the title role of SALOMÉ. Pacino also grapples with Wilde’s need to express something utterly different from anything he had written before, and with finding a way to make a movie of the entire event. An unusual, revealing and avant-garde journey into the light and heart of Oscar Wilde's masterwork.


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