THE FILE ON THELMA JORDON
1950, Paramount, 100 min, Dir: Robert Siodmak

Barbara Stanwyck is an ambiguous femme fatale who ensnares a lovelorn assistant D.A. (Wendell Corey) in a murder scheme. Ketti Frings’ screenplay imbues a traditional noir recipe with a genuine sense of longing and loss. This was Siodmak’s next-to-last film before abandoning Hollywood, and we’re thrilled to give it a rare theatrical screening. With Paul Kelly, Stanley Ridges, and Richard Rober.


CHRISTMAS IN CONNECTICUT
1945, Warner Bros. , 101 min, Dir: Peter Godfrey

Barbara Stanwyck stars as a famous expert on marriage, cooking and homemaking who is asked by her publisher to host a national hero for Christmas dinner at her Connecticut home. It should be simple, but she must scramble to keep the secret that she's single, can't cook and doesn't own a home. With a lot of help, meticulous planning and split-second timing, the urban sophisticate may succeed … but the unforeseen happens when she falls in love with her guest in this classic romantic comedy.


FLESH AND FANTASY
1943, Universal, 94 min, Dir: Julien Duvivier

Considered one of the greatest French directors (his PEPÉ LE MOKO is the virtual template for the “poetic realism” that informed film noir), Duvivier escaped the war years at home by bringing his incredible style to several offbeat Hollywood films of the early 1940s. This anthology of slightly supernatural tales - a proto-“Twilight Zone,” if you will - features a dazzling cast of stars (Edward G. Robinson, Barbara Stanwyck, Charles Boyer, Betty Field, Robert Cummings, Thomas Mitchell) and exceptional camerawork by Stanley Cortez and Paul Ivano.


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